One ordinary life told from the perspective of she who is living it. 
I do not normally read realistic or historical fiction but this book caught my eye with its simple, stark cover. When I saw how short it was – fewer than 300 pages – I thought I would give it a try. At first this book seemed like I was reading several arbitrarily arranged short stories about the same character but by the end of the book the storyline was moving in a more linear way.

Beginning with a childhood encounter with ill-fated teenage neighbor Pegeen Chahab at age seven, Marie Commeford narrates the story of her own life in brief, descriptive chapters. The story roughly follows the progression of Marie’s life interrupted by occasional flashbacks and flash-forwards, as if an adult Marie is recounting stories and tying them together in a stream of consciousness. This book has an ethereal quality to it and reading it is like looking in on someone’s memories.

I would recommend this book to fans of realistic fiction fans and to people who like books that are deep, thoughtful, and more about observation and reflection than plot.